Categories
Autism

ABA therapy Part 5 – Arguments against ABA by autistic adults and new research

Some new research is focusing on autistic experience with ABA, opening a channel to change the systemic way we approach autistic experiences and bad reviews on therapeutical practices, to start to listen, instead of to ignore.

Reason number 1: ABA in it’s purer form, is a compliance-based therapy, not independent thinking

According to the study “Recalling hidden harms of early childhood experiences of ABA“, autistic people described how in their therapy the focus on behavior was not to understand, but to identify behavior that “needed to change”:

“I was punished by having to do it again, and again and again. In ABA when they say you get a reward if you do it, they mean you get it if you do it the way they wanted the first time. If it’s not done right the first time the treats were removed and you [were] punished by repeating the act or skill or reaction over until you get it right.”

“if I complied, they complimented in a condescending manner and gave me what I liked, just as you would to a puppy”

“The focus on compliance made it harder for me to say no to people who
hurt me later”

“The therapeutic goal was presented as learning social behavior – in retrospect, this was learning to mimic NT [neurotypical, or non-autistic] social behavior. It resulted in corrosive damage to self-esteem and deep shame about who I really am. No effort was made to explain autism to me or to explain the role of sensory overload in issues like meltdowns, shutdowns, etc.”

As a former ABA provider writes: “The overall concept of compliance training is an integral part of many ABA programs. The rule is, once you give a command as an ABA Therapist, you must follow through with it no matter what. If a child tries to cry or escape or engage in any other ‘behaviors,’” the therapist can’t intervene to help or comfort the child.”

Learning through ABA in it’s purer form “is built on a teach/reward strategy to adapt behaviour” (Grindle and Remington, 2005) that considers undesirable, and “one of the core components of behavioural learning and intervention is consistency and repetition (Mohammadzaheri et al., 2014).”

Well, “intensive and chronic conditioning has instead amounted to compliance, low intrinsic motivation, and lack of independent functioning—the latter of which is the presumed goal of ABA therapy in the first place” (Wilson, Beamish, Hay, & Attwood, 2014). 

Another study said: “Compliance can be referred to as “the tendency of the individual to go along with propositions, requests, or instructions, for some immediate instrumental gain” (Gudjonsson, 1992, p. 137). While compliance has been known to lower self-esteem, it has also been strongly correlated with certain types of coping skills, most notably denial and behavior disengagement. (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989; Graf, 1971; Gudjonsson, 1989; Gudjonsson & Sigurdsson, 2003). This results in either attempting to reject the reality of a stressful event, or withdrawing effort. In fact, these patterns of coping skills can even be seen in “high functioning” individuals who have engaged in ABA conditioning, and consequently follows them into adulthood. Spouses of individuals with then-called Asperger’s Syndrome who were exposed to conditioning utilized in ABA, disclosed living with the consequences of prompt dependency and identified lack of self-motivation as a constant source of stress within their relationships (Wilson et al., 2014). These spouses also identified as filling a parent or caregiver role instead of a partner role. Additionally, prompting was found to be embedded within most that couples’ interactions and generally permeated their relationship (Wilson et al., 2014).

Reason number 2: It may cause PTSD

“I’ve turned into an anxious person afraid of consequences”

“stop trying to fix us. Short-term ‘success’ isn’t worth the long-term PTSD”

According to a study called “Evidence of increased PTSD symptoms in autistics exposed to applied behavior analysis” it shows there may exist a link between exposure to ABA therapy, and post traumatic stress.

“Based on clinical observations, children exposed to ABA demonstrated fight/flight/freeze reactions to tasks that would otherwise be deemed pleasurable to a non-exposed peer, and those responses increased in severity based on length of exposure to ABA.” according to the paper.

This goes to give an initial support (there are need for more studies) to reports from autistic people that said to develop PTSD due to the therapies they were exposed to.

There since been a study that counter Kupferstein study (Leaf et al., 2018), but were done by ABA practitioners, so we need more studies from impartial sources. Be aware there were positive outcomes in this study described by a minority part of the autistic respondants, but since the number of people were low, there is a need for more studies to see what is the difference, and how pervasive the bad or good experience is throughout the autistic community.

Reason 3: Autistic people don’t like it

In a questionaire, made online (so it is anedoctal data) show a very different perspective between autistic family and autistic people to ABA therapy. Although there are autistic people that do like it, and had good experiences, there are also a big amount that doesn’t. We need more studies into understanding why this different perspective exist.

Data from Autismisnotweird.

Also, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network ASAN, the biggest organization ran by autistic people, made the following position:

“Until now, much advocacy for coverage of “autism interventions” has focused on purely behavioral approaches, like Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA). These interventions can be inappropriate or even harmful, and exclusive focus on coverage for behavioral interventions can result in limited access to evidence-based and emerging models that focus on improving relationships, communication skills, and development of skills that are meaningful to individuals’ quality of life.”

ASAN published its paper in 2017:  Firsthand Perspectives of Behavioral Interventions for Autistic People and People with other Developmental Disabilities that says: “We believe strongly that people with lived experience can provide well-needed perspective on what works and doesn’t work for them, and that service providers working with people with disabilities can benefit from first-hand accounts. As a disability rights organization rooted in the principles of self-determination, we also believe that autistic people and other people with developmental disabilities deserve culturally competent, trauma-sensitive, empathetic care.”

Reason number 4: Masking is prejudicial for autistic people

“ABA made it much harder to make friends because I was spending so much time trying to pretend to be someone I’m not that I could never really connect to people”

“I was trained to be nonautistic […] I was taught that being able to fool
people I was neurotypical was my best goal in life”

“I was trained to be nonautistic […] I was taught that being able to fool
people I was neurotypical was my best goal in life”

“(ABA) changed the way I act, react or interact with the world […] The aim was to force a square peg into a round hole, instead of being ok with being who I am. […] Better to stay safe and isolated, than rejected”

Some autistic people reported to learn masking instead of coping through ABA. According to new studies, Masking our autistic traits is connected with a higher risk of suicide and depression. According to reports of autistic people, they were meant to repeat and learn behaviors and unlearn others, which might, with the wrong therapists, cause the autistic person to mask their traits for the sake of the therapist, instead of to learn new behaviours.

“With the behavioural changes focussed on autistic behaviour, participants indicated the need to change themselves as inhabiting a positive formation of identity.”

Conclusion

There is no doubt that ABA brings short-term improvements in behaviours, but these studies call for an analysis on the reflection on more long-term impacts, and the anxiety and trauma that seems to cause some of autistic people. The perspection of therapists, can’t be preconceived as true, and autistic opinion and feelings towards the therapies they go through should be analysed and studied. Though individuals may interpret certain methods differently, the impact participants felt cannot be labelled as misconceptions of practice, since that invalidates they very real experiences, and continues to attempt to silence the most important part of the therapy: the autistic person.


Terapia ABA Parte 5 – Argumentos contra ABA por adultos autistas e novas pesquisas

Algumas novas pesquisas focam-se na experiência autista com ABA, abrindo um canal para mudar a forma sistêmica como abordamos as experiências autistas e as críticas negativas sobre as práticas terapêuticas, para começar a ouvir, em vez de ignorar.

Razão número 1: ABA na sua forma mais pura, é uma terapia baseada em conformidade, e não em pensamento independente

De acordo com o estudo “Relembrando os danos ocultos das experiências da primeira infância com ABA“, autistas descreveram como na sua terapia o foco no comportamento não era compreender os seus comportamentos para apoio, mas identificar o que “precisava mudar”:

“Fui punido em ter que fazer isso de novo, e de novo e de novo. Na ABA, quando dizem que recebes uma recompensa se fizeres isso, eles querem dizer que receberá se fizer da maneira que eles queriam da primeira vez. Se não for feito corretamente na primeira vez, os doces são removidos e você [foi] punido repetindo o ato, habilidade ou reação até acertar.”

“se eu concordasse, eles congratulavam-me de maneira condescendente e davam-me o que eu gostava, assim como fariam com um cachorrinho”

“O foco na conformidade tornou mais difícil para mim dizer não às pessoas que me magoaram mais tarde”

“O objetivo terapêutico foi apresentado como o aprendizado do comportamento social – em retrospecto, isso foi aprender a imitar o comportamento social neurotípico. Resultou em danos corrosivos à auto-estima e profunda vergonha de quem eu realmente sou. Nenhum esforço foi feito para me explicar o autismo ou para explicar o papel da sobrecarga sensorial em questões como colapsos, desligamentos, etc. ”

Um ex-terapeuta ABA escreve: “ O conceito geral de treinamento de conformidade é parte integrante de muitos programas ABA. A regra é, assim que der um comando como um terapeuta ABA, deve seguir em frente, não importa o quê. Se uma criança tentar chorar ou escapar ou se envolver em qualquer outro ‘comportamento’, o terapeuta não pode intervir para ajudar ou confortar a criança.”

Aprender por meio do ABA em sua forma mais pura “baseia-se em uma estratégia de ensino/recompensa para adaptar o comportamento” (Grindle e Remington, 2005 ) que considera indesejáveis, e “um dos componentes principais da aprendizagem e intervenção comportamental é a consistência e a repetição (Mohammadzaheri et al., 2014).”

“O condicionamento intensivo e crônico resultou em complacência, baixa motivação intrínseca e falta de funcionamento independente – o último dos quais é o objetivo presumido da terapia ABA no primeiro lugar “( Wilson, Beamish, Hay, & amp; Attwood, 2014 ).

Outro estudo disse: “Conformidade pode ser referida como “a tendência do indivíduo de concordar com propostas, solicitações , ou instruções, para algum ganho instrumental imediato ”(Gudjonsson, 1992, p. 137). Embora a conformidade seja conhecida por diminuir a auto-estima, também foi fortemente correlacionada com certos tipos de habilidades de enfrentamento, principalmente a negação e o descompromisso . (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989; Graf, 1971; Gudjonsson, 1989; Gudjonsson e Sigurdsson, 2003). Isso resulta na tentativa de rejeitar a realidade de um evento estressante ou na retirada do esforço. Na verdade, padrões de habilidades de enfrentamento podem até mesmo ser vistos em indivíduos de “alto funcionamento” que se envolveram no condicionamento ABA e, consequentemente, os seguem na idade adulta. Cônjuges de indivíduos com a antiga chamada Síndrome de Asperger que foram expostos ao condicionamento utilizado na ABA, revelaram conviver com as consequências da dependência imediata e identificaram a falta de auto-motivação como fonte constante de ansiedade em seus relacionamentos (Wilson et al., 2014) . Esses cônjuges também foram identificados como desempenhando um papel de pai ou responsável em vez de um papel de parceiro. Além disso, descobriu-se que o estímulo está inserido na maioria das interações dos casais e geralmente permeia seu relacionamento (Wilson et al., 2014).

Razão número 2: pode causar PTSD

“Eu transformei-me numa pessoa ansiosa com medo das consequências”

“pare de tentar nos consertar. ‘Sucesso’ a curto prazo não vale o stress pós traumático de longo prazo ”

De acordo com um estudo chamado “Evidência de aumento dos sintomas de PTSD em autistas expostos à análise de comportamento aplicada” mostra que pode haver uma ligação entre a exposição à terapia ABA e stress pós-traumático.

“Com base em observações clínicas, as crianças expostas ao ABA demonstraram reações de luta/fuga/congelamento a tarefas que, de outra forma, seriam consideradas prazerosas para um colega não exposto, e essas respostas aumentaram na gravidade com base na duração da exposição ao ABA.” de acordo com o jornal.

Isso serve para dar um suporte inicial (apesar de serem necessários mais estudos) para relatos de pessoas autistas que disseram desenvolver PTSD devido às terapias a que foram expostas.

Desde então, houve um estudo que se opôs ao estudo de Kupferstein (Leaf et al., 2018), mas foi feito por profissionais de ABA, e portanto, precisamos de mais estudos de fontes imparciais. Esteja ciente de que houve resultados positivos neste estudo descritos por uma parte minoritária dos respondentes autistas, mas como o número de pessoas era baixo, há uma necessidade de mais estudos para ver qual é a diferença e como as experiências más ou boas estão difundidas na comunidade autista.

Razão 3: pessoas autistas não gostam disso

Num questionário, feito online (portanto, são dados anedóticos), mostra um perspectiva muito diferente entre opiniões de famílias de autistas e autistas sobre terapia ABA. Embora existam pessoas autistas que gostem e tenham tido boas experiências, há também uma grande quantidade que não gosta. Precisamos de mais estudos para entender por que essa perspectiva diferente existe.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-10.png

Além disso, a Autistic Self Advocacy Network ASAN , a maior organização dirigida por pessoas autistas, tomou a seguinte posição:

“Até agora, muito da defesa da cobertura de“ intervenções no autismo ”se concentrou em abordagens puramente comportamentais, como a Análise Comportamental Aplicada (ABA). Essas intervenções podem ser inadequadas ou mesmo prejudiciais, e o foco exclusivo na cobertura de intervenções comportamentais pode resultar em acesso limitado a modelos emergentes e baseados em evidências que se concentram na melhoria dos relacionamentos, habilidades de comunicação e desenvolvimento de habilidades que são significativas para a qualidade dos indivíduos vida. ”

ASAN publicou um artigo em 2017: Perspectivas em primeira mão de intervenções comportamentais para pessoas autistas e pessoas com outras deficiências de desenvolvimento que diz: “Acreditamos fortemente que pessoas com experiência vivida podem fornecer uma perspectiva necessária sobre o que funciona e o que não funciona e que os prestadores de serviços que trabalham com pessoas com deficiência possam se beneficiar de relatos em primeira mão. Como uma organização de direitos das pessoas com deficiência enraizada nos princípios da autodeterminação, também acreditamos que as pessoas autistas e outras pessoas com deficiências de desenvolvimento merecem cuidado culturalmente competente, sensível ao trauma e empático. ”

Razão número 4: mascarar é prejudicial para pessoas autistas

“O ABA tornou muito mais difícil fazer amigos porque eu estava gastando muito tempo tentando fingir ser alguém que não sou e que nunca poderia realmente me conectar com as pessoas”

“Fui treinado para ser não-autista […] fui ensinado que ser capaz de enganar as pessoas que eu era neurotípico era meu melhor objetivo na vida”

“(ABA) mudou a maneira como eu ajo, reajo ou interajo com o mundo […] O objetivo era forçar um pino quadrado num buraco redondo, em vez de aceitar ser quem eu sou. […] Melhor ficar seguro e isolado, do que rejeitado”

Algumas pessoas autistas relataram aprender a mascarar em vez de lidar com ABA. De acordo com novos estudos , mascarar os nossos traços autistas está relacionado a um maior risco de suicídio e depressão. De acordo com relatos de pessoas autistas, elas deveriam repetir e aprender comportamentos e desaprender outros, o que poderia, com os terapeutas errados, fazer com que a pessoa autista mascarasse seus traços para o bem do terapeuta, em vez de aprender novos comportamentos.

“Com as mudanças comportamentais focadas no comportamento autista, os participantes indicaram a necessidade de se mudarem a si mesmos como habitando uma formação positiva de identidade.”

Conclusão

Não há dúvida de que ABA traz melhorias de comportamento a curto prazo, mas estes estudos e experiencias pedem uma análise e reflexão sobre os impactos a longo prazo, e a ansiedade e o trauma que parece causar algumas pessoas autistas. A perspectiva dos terapeutas não pode ser preconcebida como verdadeira, e a opinião e os sentimentos dos autistas em relação às terapias pelas quais passam devem ser analisados e estudados. Embora os indivíduos possam interpretar certos métodos de maneira diferente, o impacto que os participantes sentiram não pode ser rotulado como equívocos da prática, uma vez que isso invalida suas experiências muito reais e continua a tentar silenciar a parte mais importante da terapia: os autistas.

Categories
Autism

Alexythimia: the difficulty in knowing what we feel

Alexithymia is the difficulty in distinguishing the emotions we feel, identifying bodily sensations from emotional states, as well as describing our feelings, using emotional terms, or reading and identifying what others feel. This means that we can have an emotional reaction and not know how to identify it (sadness, uncertainty, etc.) or how to describe it.

At least 50% of Autists are thought to have Alexithymia and it is behind the lack of empathy sometimes associated with Autism, which means is the alexythimia, not Autism, that cause that lack of empathy. In fact, many autistic people have hyper empathy.

If there is something very obvious to bother us about, we know why we are upset or sad, or we know whether we feel good or bad, but if what we feel is more subtle or less specific we can go days without understanding what we are feeling. We can even confuse feelings with bodily sensations like a headache. It is especially important when applied to relationships and can lead to abusive relationships or toxic friendships since if we do not know how to identify what others feel, or our own emotions, we can ignore uncertainty, discomfort or insecurity.

Through cognitive and supportive therapies, however, we can learn to identify emotions and describe how we feel.

However, it is very important to give the autistic people space to discover what they feel and if you see any discomfort, to help identify their emotions.

For more information check the article in this link.


Alexitimia é a dificuldade em distinguir as emoções que sentimos, identificar sensações corporais provenientes de estados emocionais, assim como descrever os nossos sentimentos, usar termos emotivos, ou ler e identificar o que os outros sentem. Isto significa que podemos ter uma reação emocional e não sabermos como a identificar (tristeza, incerteza,etc) nem como a descrever.

Pensa-se que pelo menos 50% dos Autistas tenham Alexitimia e que está por detrás da falta de empatia por vezes associada ao Autismo. É a alexitimia, não o Autismo, que causa falta de empatia. Na verdade, muitos autistas têm hiper empatia.

Se houver algo muito óbvio a incomodar-nos, sabemos porque ficamos chateados ou tristes, ou sabemos se nos sentimos bem ou mal, mas se o que sentirmos é mais subtil ou menos específico podemos ficar dias sem compreender o que estamos a sentir. Podemos até confundir sentimentos com sensações corporais como dor de cabeça. É especialmente importante quando aplicado a relações e pode levar a relacionamentos abusivos ou amizades tóxicas visto que se não sabemos identificar o que os outros sentem, ou as nossas próprias emoções, podemos ignorar incertezas, desconfortos ou insegurança.

Através de terapias cognitivas e de apoio, podemos no entanto aprender a identificar emoções e descrever o que sentimos.

É importantíssimo no entanto dar espaço ao autista para descobrir o que sente e se vir algum desconforto, ajudar na identificação das suas emoções.

Para mais informações veja o artigo neste link.

Categories
Autism Conversations

Actually Autistic Meme thread

#actuallyautistic Memes Day! (actuallyautistic is a community online to give visibility to autistic voices) Nothing tells us we can’t fight for acceptance AND have fun.

Brief explanation: Auditory processing disorder is a hearing disorder where we have trouble processing speech.

x

Brief explanation: in general Autistic people don’t want a “cure” to push on us. Autism is part of who we are. We want support and understanding. 


Dia para memes #ActuallyAutistic (comunidade para partilha de vozes autistas)

Nada nos diz que não podemos lutar por aceitação E divertirmos-nos.

Como talvez saiba o nosso Instagram é em inglês, mas para haver uma plataforma portuguesa de um Autista para Autista decidi criar o @autismoemportugues no Instagram. Irei lá colocar memes, informação e dados.

Breve explicação: Desordem de processamento auditivo é quando temos dificuldade em processar discurso, a fala
Em geral os autistas não querem uma cura a ser empurrada para eles, queremos aceitação e apoio. O Autismo faz parte de quem somos.